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Preparing for Your Next Vet Visit

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Pet Insurance 

A pet insurance policy can make it much easier to afford veterinary bills, but policies may offer substantially different levels of coverage. Before you buy a policy, compare:

Coverage

It's important to determine what services are covered by the policy. Some policies only cover accidents and illnesses, not annual exams and vaccinations. Many policies do not cover pre-existing conditions.

Cost

Find out how much you will pay in deductibles each year. Policies with low deductibles may seem more attractive initially, but they are not such a good deal if they exclude too many services or treatments. Ask how much yearly premiums will cost now and when your pet is older. Some companies charge higher premiums when your pet reaches a certain age.

Reimbursement

Most pet insurance policies require you to pay the vet the full amount due and submit receipts for reimbursement. Find out how long it will take to receive a reimbursement and what percentage of your bill will be covered.

The (Not So) Small Stuff

Read insurance policy information carefully before you buy. Some important information may be hiding in the small print. Make sure you read every word of the policy to avoid unpleasant surprises.

If you have concerns about your pet's health, or it's time for an annual examination, call us today. Our knowledgeable, experienced staff provides caring service with your pet's comfort in mind.

If you have ever returned home from a vet visit and realized that you forgot to ask an important question, you are not alone. It's easy to become distracted during the appointment, particularly if your pet is frightened or anxious. Preparation is the key to ensuring that all of your questions and concerns are addressed during the visit.

Bring Medical Records

Bring any records you received if your pet visited another veterinarian or received treatment from an emergency clinic since your last appointment. These records provide important information about your pet's health and will help your vet prepare a treatment plan if there is an ongoing or chronic problem.

If this is your first visit with a new veterinarian, ask your previous vet to transfer your pet's records a few weeks before your appointment. Records offer details about your pet's medical history, previous illnesses, surgeries and illnesses, and provide other information that your new vet will find helpful.

Note Recent Changes

Your vet needs to hear about any changes in your pet's health or daily routine. Tell him or her if you have recently changed the brand of food your pet eats or if another veterinarian prescribed a new medication. Changes in your pet’s habits can be a sign of illness or injury. Make a list of any recent changes and bring it to your pet's appointment. The following types of changes should be discussed:

  • Changes in bathroom habits. Does your pet urinate more or less frequently than normal or have trouble urinating? Have you noticed diarrhea or constipation?
  • Water intake. Do you have to fill your pet's water bowl more often lately, or is your pet suddenly uninterested in drinking?
  • Behavior. Have you noticed a difference in your pet's energy level or interest in playing?
  • Physical signs. Note any symptoms that concern you. These might include lumps or bumps, frequent vomiting or difficulty walking or jumping.
  • Appetite. Has your pet's appetite changed?
  • Weight. Has your pet recently gained or lost weight?

Ask About Samples

Avoid a return trip to the office by asking if the vet wants you to bring a stool sample with you when you visit. If a sample is needed, find out how large the sample must be and how it should be collected and stored. In some cases, your vet may request a urine sample. If you have a dog, getting the sample may be as easy as placing a container under the urine stream when your pet urinates. Getting a sample from a cat can be a little more difficult. Your vet may suggest that you use a special type of cat litter. Because this litter isn't absorbent, you can simply pour the urine from the litter box into a container.

Bring a Carrier or Leash

Even the best-behaved dog or cat can become overwhelmed by the sights, sounds and smells at the vet's office. If your pet is frightened or feels threatened, it may try to escape or might become aggressive toward another animal. Maintain control by using a leash, crate or carrier.

If the only time you use a leash or carrier is when you visit the vet, your pet's stress level may rise the minute it spots these items. Walk your dog on a leash occasionally before your visit, even if he or she usually roams your property without one. Make your pet's crate or carrier a tempting place to rest by placing a soft cushion and toys inside.

Pet Care Is Our Passion

Pet Care Is Our Passion

AAA Animal Hospital is a full service veterinary hospital that is dedicated to the health, happiness and well being of your pet. Each of your pets becomes part of the AAA family and receives uncompromising care, service and genuine concern by our entire hospital staff. AAA Animal Hospital has thousands of satisfied patients over the past 35 years. We offer low cost vaccinations, spaying and neutering. We have a new state of the art facility which offers digital x -rays, in-house laboratory testing, a fully stocked pharmacy, ultrasound, and orthopedic and soft tissue surgeries. Our hospital carries a wide variety of prescription diets and all the latest in flea control including Nexgard and Comfortis. We also offer boarding for cats and dogs with brand new "condo" style facilities. Call us to book your boarding reservation today.

      Starting November 1st we will  be taking Appointments! Walk-ins will still be accepted. To make your visit faster you can schedule appointments on line through Petly or call us.

We have also extended our dental days to Tuesday and Thursday.

Last exam is an hour before closing.

  Monday -Friday 7:30-9pm

     Saturday-Sunday 8am-5pm

We close early the day before most major holidays and are closed on the holiday. 

THIS ---->https://myaaavetnet.vetmatrixbase.com/index.php

Business Hours

DayOpenClosed
Monday7:30am9:00pm
Tuesday7:30am9:00pm
Wednesday7:30am9:00pm
Thursday7:30am9:00pm
Friday7:30am9:00pm
Saturday8:00am5:00pm
Sunday8:00am5:00pm
Day Open Closed
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
7:30am 7:30am 7:30am 7:30am 7:30am 8:00am 8:00am
9:00pm 9:00pm 9:00pm 9:00pm 9:00pm 5:00pm 5:00pm

What is Petly

See your pet on Petly – As your pet's personal health page, Petly is a special place for you and your pet. You're just one click away! – GO TO PETLY

Petly is a secure personal health page for your pet that gives you direct access to your pet's health records 24/7. We're happy to provide Petly to all our current clients who have an active email address at the practice. 

Petly is a great way to view your pet's health records, anytime, plus you can easily connect with us at your convenience. Petly offers many features to help you keep track of your pet's health needs and shares informative articles on the latest trends in pet health.

Need Vaccine History for traveling this weekend? With Petly you can print your vaccine records right from home, plus so much more including:

  • View your Pet's Visit History at our Practice
  • View Upcoming Appointment Information
  • Request Appointments & Prescription Refills
  • Sign-up to for Appointment Reminder Text Messages
  • Update Us on any changes to your Address & Phone
  • View our Recent Facebook Posts!
  • Manage your Email Preferences* 

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